gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954
gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits
martha flowers, 1953
diana sands, 1963
alvin ailey, 1955
joyce bryant, 1953
leontyne price, 1953
mahalia jackson, 1962
james earl jones, 1961
zora neale hurston, 1940
harry belafonte, 1954
james baldwin, 1954

gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits

  1. martha flowers, 1953
  2. diana sands, 1963
  3. alvin ailey, 1955
  4. joyce bryant, 1953
  5. leontyne price, 1953
  6. mahalia jackson, 1962
  7. james earl jones, 1961
  8. zora neale hurston, 1940
  9. harry belafonte, 1954
  10. james baldwin, 1954

(via anikamyerspalm)

ltscalledgrammartonta:

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

also actually hiring people who belong in that culture.
ltscalledgrammartonta:

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

also actually hiring people who belong in that culture.
ltscalledgrammartonta:

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

also actually hiring people who belong in that culture.
ltscalledgrammartonta:

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

also actually hiring people who belong in that culture.
ltscalledgrammartonta:

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

also actually hiring people who belong in that culture.

ltscalledgrammartonta:

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

also actually hiring people who belong in that culture.

(via osolage)

“The raising of a hand with a phone in it lets you know someone is taking a photo or a video. If in the future, all a person has to do is look at you, and you can’t tell if they are recording or not, the paradigm of privacy will have shifted.”
hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed hoodfuturism:

this is so blessed

Dont let ferguson die because it isnt trending anymore

(via silent3)

bryankonietzko:

korranation:

Hey Korra Nation, BIG NEWS!!!

IF THIS PICTURE (drawn by the one-and-only Bryan K) GETS OVER 15,000 NOTES, WE’LL RELEASE OUR FIRST EXCLUSIVE CLIP FROM BOOK 4 ONLINE TOMORROW MORNING!

So what’re you waiting for? Let’s do this!!!

Looks like you hit the target!

(via drawology)

Episode 44 - Antionette Carroll

Revision Path

Listen

Antionette Carroll is one of the leading people championing for diversity in the design community. As the chair of AIGA’s Diversity and Inclusion Task Force, she’s spearheading initiatives with the organization to increase the numbers of women and minorities in the field through outreach, mentorship, and more. 

Our conversation explores why diversity is so important when it comes to design, why inclusion is a crucial part of solving this problem, as well as a bit about her own background and career. You’ll definitely hear more about her work in the future!

SUBSCRIBE, RATE, AND REVIEW: iTunes | Soundcloud | Stitcher Radio

Interested in sponsoring the Revision Path podcast? Visit our Donate page and help support the show! ***

Black artist problems

blaxsheep:

I used to be embarrassed that I only drew black people, but then I realized that if I don’t draw them, who will?

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

“Critics generally don’t associate Black people with ideas. They see marginal people; they see just another story about Black folks. They regard the whole thing as sociologically interesting perhaps, but very parochial. There’s a notion out in the land that there are human beings one writes about, and then there are Black people or Indians or some other marginal group. If you write about the world from that point of view, somehow it is considered lesser. We are people, not aliens. We live, we love, and we die.”
— Toni Morrison (via blackcontemporaryart)

(via afrofuturistaffair)